A Letter To God’s Wonderful People of FiveTwo

Posted by on Mar 11, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Dear FiveTwo,

Six years ago, when eight men and I took the first steps in starting FiveTwo, I might have briefly thought of leading FiveTwo full-time one day. However, over the past few years and especially the past few months, the tug on my heart to give my full energy and effort to leading FiveTwo has become more than a tug, and the day has arrived. I have decided to step aside from leading CrossPoint Community Church, a ministry my family and I helped plant 18 years ago, in order to lead FiveTwo, a network that fuels sacramental, entrepreneurial people who start new in order to reach new. I’m just as scared and excited as I was when my family landed in Katy, Texas in 1997!

Read More

The Engine Under The Hood

Posted by on Jul 23, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

Here's a vid about the engine under our hood, the fuel for our movement.  Enjoy!

 

Read More

The Double-G Combo of FiveTwo’s Action-Orientation (cont.)

Posted by on Jul 1, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

Last post we talked about the first G: Go.  In FiveTwo, we're about going.  Getting stuff done.  Seeking out new people.  But the going is for a purpose: Gather.  That's the second G of the Double.  And Action-Oriented is FiveTwo's #3 Value.  Pay attention.

You go so you can gather.  That's why Sacramental Entrepreneurs exist.  It's the apostolic in us coming out.  We like to go and we like to gather, especially gathering people into Jesus' Church.  Which we know isn't really us gathering.  Nah.  We're not that good.

Sacramental entrepreneurs live knowing the presence of Jesus lives in them.  So wherever I go, I’m bringing Jesus to those people.  All the power of the Holy Spirit and all of the grace and mercy of Jesus are present for me to give.  The relationships I form with them ultimately lead to my heart which loves Jesus, adores Jesus and can’t help but speak of Jesus.

So whenever I go and wherever I go, I’m constantly gathering people to Jesus as I gather people to me.   I don’t want them to just get to know Bill Woolsey; I want them to meet Jesus.  Because He’s who’s a the center of Bill Woolsey. 

Ultimately I’m not just inviting them to help start a church or launch a business or improve a neighborhood, I’m inviting them to meet God-in-the-flesh who empowers me, graces me, and provides a purpose for my life – your life – that is infinitely better than anything I could ever have imagined.

Starting Isn't a Solo Sport

So gathering is key b/c it’s how people meet Jesus.  But it’s also critical b/c starting ministries or businesses; improving communities or planting churches, those are not solo sports.  They may originate in the heart of one person but they live out only when they live in the hearts of many.  Get that?  A vision embraced by only one heart is only a dream.  For it to become a reality, many hearts must own it.

God may have given you the vision for this new endeavor, but if you do not gather people around that vision, it will remain but a dream.

Keep in mind that gathering begins when you lay out just exactly who you need on the team.  What gifts are necessary to pull this off?  What people have I met while going who have the gifts this vision calls for?  There are definite planning components that go into gathering.  But ultimately, if I’m going to gather, I have to ask.  I have to invite people to join.

Remember also, especially in the early stages, to gather leaders.  Leaders exponentially expand your efforts b/c leaders not only have followers; they also know how to get things done.  Someone once told me: “Leaders know what needs to be done; why it needs to be done; and how to gather the resources to make it happen.”  What leaders am I gathering around my cause?

One reality check before closing: going and gathering is not a one-shot deal.  It’s not just one day a week.  It’s a little going, a little gathering, every day, every week so that my movement multiplies into momentum that moves way beyond me.

In FiveTwo, we’re action-oriented.  We take action.  We get stuff done.  We go and gather so that God’s kingdom grows across geographies and generations for eternity.

 

Read More

5 Respect-Full Behaviors For Sacramental Entrepreneurs

Posted by on Jun 26, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

Respect has been our entrée the last few posts.  Partly because it occupies the #2 slot in FiveTwo's values.  Mainly because respect opens the door to deep, long relationships. And divinely, because it lives out Jesus’ command to “Love your neighbor as yourself.”  Wow, a trifecta!  

What makes this value so invaluable for sacramental entrepreneurs is that when you go to start something, you’re going to need people to join you in your cause.  If you’ll approach your case with a sincere respect for all, from a posture that is beneath all resulting in talking up to people, as people of more worth than you, you’ll discover that posture is very Jesus-like and actually, refreshing and attractive.

So what does this look like in practice?  Here are five behaviors that say, “I respect you.”  

The Big Five

1.  I’ll trust you before you prove trustworthyYou don’t have to jump through a hoop before I’ll trust you.  This might cost me some pain, I might get taken, but ultimately I don’t have anything to lose and more than likely, it will open the door on incredibly gifted people God brings into my life, helping carry the burden of whatever I’m starting.

2.  I'll ask questions about your life rather than just tell you about mine.  If you get good at this, you’ll discover you know a lot about people.  Which will help you understand why they feel the way they feel.  Which will allow you to see their side, not in order to convince you but in order to compassion you.  It will stop you from being so judgmental.  When I truly want to know your story, when I listen to the nuances of your story, that’s a huge sign of respect.

3.  I'll embrace your values that don't conflict with my core valuesAnd my core values should be pretty few.  Like my family and Jesus.  But how I worship Jesus, whether I read about Jesus in the NIV or ESV, if I like Indian food or not, basically most of my preferences in life, if I respect you, I’ll adopt your preferences.  Why not?  What’s it going to hurt me?  Shouldn’t the question be how’s it going to help you?

4.  I'll learn your languageWhich means I won’t make you learn my language: I’ll learn your language.  I'll communicate in your language.  I'll translate my theology into your language.  I’ll learn to love your music, share your dress, embrace your customs, laugh at your jokes, not in a fake way.  In a real way, because I respect you.  I truly love you.

5.  I'll let you belong before you believeThis one’s huge for us in the Church.  We’ve forgotten what it’s like to not belong.  If I respect you, I’ll invite you into my life, welcome you into my home, into my groups, into my activities so that you experience community that says “You’re loved.”  I don’t keep you on the outside, looking in.  Rather I invite you to walk with me in the same direction, following Jesus, even when you aren’t sure who this Jesus is.  Because if I invite you into relationship and community with other Jesus followers, there’s a really good chance before you know it, you’ll believe it because you’ll have belonged it.

What’s your posture?  What’s your position?  Are you talking up to someone or down to someone?  Respect for All means I’m always beneath you.  You’re always above me.  No matter your vocation, your role, your status or lack thereof.  You’re a child of God, designed by God, redeemed by God.  You’re worthy of all of my respect.  

Which should definitely live itself out in my behaviors.

What say you?  Shout it out in the comment section below.

Read More

The Deep Connection Between Story and Respect

Posted by on Jun 24, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

Want to know how I can tell if you have respect for someone?  I listen to the words and tone you use when you tell a story about them.  Respect comes to life in relationships and story.

FiveTwo’s second core value is “Respect for All.”  Story and respect are soulmates.

Leona Elenora Renatta Richter Fischer

It was a long name, given by her German parents, who also gave her Jesus.  Whom she in turn gave me.  My grandmother was my spiritual mentor.  She poured Jesus into me for decades.  And she embodied FiveTwo’s value “Respect for all,” perhaps because she remembered her past.  From a poor family in The Grove,Texas, her and Papa were sharecroppers early in marriage, eventually working their way up to delivering Lone Star beer and packing boxes of Hefty trash bags on an assembly line.  When I lived with them my freshman summer of college, I made more money than both combined while interning at Texas Instruments basically doing nothing.

Yet theirs was never a regretful or bitter story.  Instead, thankfulness and respect poured from them.  Whether the waitress they met for the first time or the friend of mine I invited for Christmas dinner, all were welcome.  All were worthy of belonging simply because all had a story.

Which was one of grandma’s hallmarks: she wanted to know your story.  Really know.  She’d ask questions about your family, your loves, your career.  She listened now and later would remember the details and pray for the struggles.

No one had ever taught her knowing someone’s story communicated great respect for a person.  She never openly said that to me.  But that’s what happened when she was in the room.  Respect flowed from her as she listened to your narrative.

What’s Your Story?

When I ask about your story and take your story to heart, connection happens.  We now have shared history.  I understand why you don’t like pastors since that one wouldn’t do your dad’s funeral.  I gain insight into why love vacations since you never had one growing up.  I appreciate your addiction to pizza and abhorrence of Chianti.  That Italian aunt really did a number on you.

Getting to know your story allows me to understand why you are you.  And when I allow your story to become part of my story, why you are you becomes part of why I am me.  My life is richer, and your heart, fuller.  Listening to story demonstrates respect and creates respect.

Are you able to respect someone if you don’t know their story?  I would hope so.  Respect for someone shouldn’t depend on their story; it should flow from their person.  Specifically from the fact they are a person.  They are one of the crown creations of the Creator.  They are worthy of our ears.

But if you want to create respect and start off well, then get to know their story.

It’s the sacramental way.

Read More
Page 1 of 512345